Facebook Was Built To Exploit Bugs In Human Brain, Says Facebook ex-President

Facebook Was Built To Exploit Bugs In Human Brain, Says Facebook ex-President

Sean Parker brought his name to people’s lips after creating Napster. The entrepreneur was also an early investor and Facebook’s ex-President, but now he says he has become “something of a conscientious objector” on social media.

At an Axios event in Philadelphia, Parker gave some tidbits on how companies like Facebook are ballooning so much. That’s because people like him, Mark Zuckerberg, and Kevin Systrom (co-founder of Instagram) found the bugs in the human brain. All people crave is appreciation and fame, and that’s what social networks have given to the netizens.

Bringing more people to Facebook and keeping them stuck inside the blue network is like some vicious cycle. Users post something, they get comments and likes, and they post more.

“It’s a social-validation feedback loop,” Parker said. It’s “exactly the kind of thing that a hacker like myself would come up with, because you’re exploiting a vulnerability in human psychology.”

The underlying thought process while creating platforms like Facebook or Instagram is something like “How do we consume as much of your time and conscious attention as possible?”

“We’ll get you eventually,” Parker recalled. He told this to people who were on social media and preferred real-life interactions. But Parker was unaware of the consequences of their social network which would burst into a community of 2 billion users and change the society in ways we can’t imagine.

“God only knows what it’s doing to our children’s brains.”

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